Posts Tagged: bone broth

Why FASTING will solve ALL your health problems

I love to eat.

So when I first started hearing about studies proving that short periods of fasting could help people lose weight, reduce inflammation, and initiate a massive repair response in the body, I was skeptical.

I have spent decades studying nutrition. I was a big fan of eat 6-8 meals a day, especially breakfast. But when enough research begins to prove a nutritional strategy is working, I want to try it.

I first started with INTERMITTENT FASTING.

Intermittent fasting is where you are eating all the food you want in a shorter period of time. I eat my meals between noon and 8pm, giving myself 16 hours of being in a fasted state. Research proves that 15-18 hours fasting provides the best health benefit.

At first this was difficult. I love breakfast. So I started by taking a smoothie with me in the morning as I walked out the door. I tried to go as long as could not drinking the smoothie. At first I could only make it till 10am (12 hours of fasting). But as I applied intermittent fasting to my health habits everyday, I noticed that I could go longer and longer periods without food.

I then tried a ONE DAY BONE BROTH FAST.

If you haven’t noticed, bone broth is all the rage right now. And with good reason. Bone broth has nutrients in it that can heal a leaky gut and help give key nutrients to the liver. It also is easy to make.

After I had incorporated intermittent fasting into my life, going longer periods without food was becoming easier. The made bone broth fasting quiet easy.

The first step to a daily bone broth fast I tried was going to dinner to dinner without eating anything but bone broth. What that means is that you have a healthy dinner one night, drink only bone broth during the next day, followed by a healthy dinner the next night. That allows you to go 24 hours with out food.

Once you have mastered that you go sunrise to sunset with only bone broth, no food.

The results I experienced were profound.

I do this every week. I pick one fasting day. What I have noticed is that the days I fast, I have greater mental clarity and more energy. The days after the fast I have very little hunger. In fact, my hunger and cravings have gone completely away since I introduced these fasting strategies into my life. So much so that I often have to remind myself to eat.

So what are the studies saying that fasting does to your body? Why are so many people trying these fasting techniques out?

Fasting has a way of accelerating healing and gets your body to repair itself. It will:

  • Normalizing your insulin  and leptin sensitivity, which is key for optimal health
  • Improving biomarkers of disease
  • Normalizing ghrelin levels, also known as “the hunger hormone”
  • Reducing inflammation and lessening free radical damage
  • Lowering triglyceride levels
  • Preserving memory functioning and learning
  • Increase your growth hormone (a fat burning hormone) secretion by 1300%
  • Boost your brain power by stimulating BDNF (a brain boosting hormone) by 400%

If you haven’t tried fasting. I highly recommend it.

Start by intermittent fasting daily. Try to go 15 hours without food. You may only go 13 hours to start, but with repetition your body will get more and more used to fasting and will comfortably go 15 hours.

The one warning I have, is that people with  adrenal fatigue will really struggle with fasting. They can find themselves dizzy and ready to pass out. If this is you, be sure that you are doing everything you can to strengthen your adrenals. There are two supplements I love for strengthen adrenals Ga by Systemic Formulas and Loving Energy by Bioray. You can find them on my website store at:

http://familylifechiropractic.com/our-stores/

Or reach out to my office at 408-298-8092 and my staff will walk you through my adrenal repair protocol.
http://familylifechiropractic.com/our-stores/

Happy fasting!!! I would love to hear how you are do with these fasting tools. Shoot me an email and give me an update when you try them out.

Have a healthy day!

Dr. Mindy
www.drmindypelz.com

Dr. Mindy Pelz
Dr. Mindy's Bone Broth
Ingredients:
  • Organic chicken stock
  • organic bone broth,
  • turmeric
  • ginger and liquid aminos from Whole Foods. I grated extra turmeric and ginger into the broth for taste.
Here are the benefits for your gut:
  1. Chicken broth and bone broth- heals and seals your gut for leaky gut conditions.
  2. Ginger- adds in digestion
  3. Turmeric -anti-inflammatory & anti-carcinogenic
  4. Liquid aminos -gives key amino acids to liver to cleanse
Heat it on the stove. Took me one minute to make and two minutes to cook.

Makes about 4 quarts, takes about 20 minutes to prepare and 2 hours to simmer

Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 cups yellow onions, chopped coarsely
  • 1 cup celery, sliced into 1/4-inch pieces
  • 1 cup carrots, cut into 1/4-inch rounds
  • 1/2 pound diced cooked ham, cut into cubes
  • 3 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
  • 2 quarts chicken bone broth or pork/ham bone broth
  • dash celery salt
  • generous dash freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 pound plum tomatoes, cored and cut into quarters
  • 1 can chick peas, drained and rinsed well
  • 2 cans low sodium cannellini beans, drained and rinsed well
  • 2 sprigs rosemary
  • 3 sprigs thyme
  • 1 sprig oregano
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 large head kale, stems removed and cut into bite-size pieces
  • 1 large head escarole, washed well and torn into bite-sized pieces
  • 2 cups cooked pasta, small shapes such as stars or elbows, if desired

Preparation:

  1. In a large soup pot, over a medium flame, heat the olive oil.
  2. Add the onion and cook for 3 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  3. Add the celery and cook for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  4. Add the carrot and cook for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  5. Add the ham cubes and cook until lightly browned, about 4 minutes.
  6. Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute.
  7. Add the chicken bone broth and increase the flame under the pot to high.
  8. Bring the mixture to a boil.
  9. Lower the heat to medium low and simmer for 15 minutes.
  10. Add the seasonings and tomatoes. Cook for 10 minutes.
  11. Add the beans and chick peas. Cook for 10 minutes.
  12. Add the kale. Cook for 10 minutes.
  13. Add the escarole. Cook for 10 to 15 minutes, or until desired doneness. If you are adding cooked pasta, place in the pot and heat it through for 5 to 7 minutes.
  14. Serve with crusty bread on the side and a generous sprinkle of Parmesan or Romano cheese on top if desired.

Cooking time about 2 hours, preparation time about 10 minutes.

Ingredients:

  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 cup yellow onions, chopped coarsely
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
  • 3 large carrots, chopped into 1/4 rounds
  • 1 tablespoon dried thyme
  • dash hickory smoked salt
  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 8 cups ham hock bone broth, pork or chicken bone broth
  • 1 pound dried split green peas
  • 1 cup cooked ham, diced

Preparation:

  1. In a large stock pot over a medium flame, heat the olive oil.
  2. Add the onions and cook for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  3. Add the garlic and cook for 3 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  4. Add the carrots and cook for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  5. Stir in the thyme, hickory salt and pepper.
  6. Add the ham hock bone broth. Raise the flame to high, and bring the mixture to a boil.
  7. Stir in the split peas.
  8. Lower the heat to medium low. Simmer for 1 hour, uncovered, stirring occasionally to make sure nothing sticks to the bottom. If the soup starts to get too thick, add more bone broth or some hot water.
  9. Remove any froth from the top of the pot.
  10. Add the ham and continue to simmer for 30 more minutes, stirring occasionally to make sure nothing sticks and the soup reaches your desired thickness or thinness. Test the tenderness of the split peas by crushing them against the side of the pot with the back of a spoon. They should mush easily.
  11. Serve hot with some crusty brown bread.

 

This is a common recipe ingredient in a lot of cookbooks and online recipes these days. Making this yourself will help you avoid the mountains of salt in this type of soup which even the low sodium varieties have. It can serve as a handy creamy base in a variety of recipes.

Ingredients: 

  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup skim milk
  • 1/2 cup chicken bone broth
  • 1/2 cup diced chicken pieces, cooked
  • 1 tablespoon yellow onion, finely diced

Preparation:

  1. Melt the butter in a saucepan over medium heat and add the olive oil.
  2. Add the onions and cook until soft, stirring occasionally, about 6 minutes.Whisk in the flour and cook for 1 to 2 minutes. Be sure not to scorch or burn it.
  3. Slowly whisk in the milk and bone broth a little at a time to avoid lumps.
  4. Cook over medium to low heat, stirring often, until the soup starts to reach your desired thickness.
  5. Fold in the chicken and heat through, stirring often.
  6. Serve as is, or use in recipes such as casseroles. This recipe makes the equivalent of 1 can of store-bought condensed cream of chicken soup.
  7. Multiply the ingredients by the number of cans any recipe calls for. Just be sure not to burn the butter and flour mixture.

Variations:

You can substitute celery or mushrooms for the chicken to make your own homemade versions of those popular cream soups as well. In this case, add them with the onions. Leeks or leek and potato would be two other good variations. Process the soup until the vegetables are fully incorporated.

 

This is a hearty stew with a rich gravy. The alcohol will cook off. This makes about 1 quart of stew. It takes about 20 minutes to prepare and an hour to cook.

Ingredients:

  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 yellow onions, chopped finely
  • 1 1/2 lbs. lean beef, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
  • 1 bottle of Guinness Stout
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 2 pounds mushrooms, washed well, and sliced lengthwise into about three pieces each
  • 2 cups beef bone broth
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1 tsp thyme
  • Dash salt
  • 1 tsp pepper
  • Generous dash of Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 cup of cubed meat from the bone broth, if desired

Preparation:

  1. In a stock pot over a medium flame, heat the oil.
  2. Add the onions and cook for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  3. Stir in the beef. Brown the meat for about 5 minutes, stirring often. Try to brown it on all sides so that nothing pink remains.
  4. Pour in the bottle of Guinness Stout. Allow to heat for about two minutes, stirring occasionally.
  5. Add the brown sugar and stir to dissolve.
  6. Simmer for 5 minutes.
  7. Stir in the mushrooms, bone broth, bay leaves, thyme, salt and pepper.
  8. Add the Worcestershire sauce.
  9. Bring the mixture to a boil. Stir well.
  10. Reduce the heat to low and simmer 30 minutes or until desired thickness.
  11. Stir in the cubed meat, if desired, and heat through, about 5 minutes.

 

Note: The mushrooms will release a good deal of liquid, so keep an eye on the stew in the last 10 minutes to be sure it is not too wet or too dry. If dry, add more stock. If too wet, continue cooking for 3 to 7 more minutes until the desired consistency is reached.

 

Serve on a bed of mashed potatoes so you don’t waste any of the succulent gravy. Serve carrots, or peas and carrots on the side, and boiled new potatoes if you wish.

Basic Bone Broth Recipe

Ingredients:

  • 4 pounds of bones
  • Water to cover bones in pot
  • Generous dash of apple cider vinegar

Preparation:

  1. Check your bones to make sure there is no excessive fat or gristle on them. Trim as needed.
  2. Place the bones in the large stock pot. Fill with water until the bones are covered. Do not overfill the pot.
  3. Bring to a boil. Then reduce heat, to a simmer, add the vinegar, and cook for 30 minutes.
  4. If you are going to use a slow cooker, transfer the recipe to it, being careful not to splash or burn yourself.
  5. Cook for 12 to 72 hours depending on your method, and the type of bones.
  6. Allow the mixture to cool.
  7. Strain through a wire-mesh sieve, or your funnel, lining them with a paper coffee filter if you wish. Or strain through a re-usable coffee filter.

Cooking Time for Your Bones

Beef, Pork, Ham, Lamb 48 to 72 Hours over a simmering flame, or in the slow cooker
Chicken or Poultry: 12 to 24 Hours over a simmering flame, or in the slow cooker
Make sure you check the liquid levels periodically to ensure nothing boils dry.

How to Store Your Bone Broth

Once you have strained the broth, allow to cool to room temperature before placing in bottles or containers so no condensation forms to make the broth watery.
The broth will keep for up to 3 days in the refrigerator and up to 6 months in the freezer.

In terms of animal bones, look for grass-fed organic animals.

Poultry Bones-Cook for 12 to 24 hours Chicken
Carcasses-after you have carved the bird:

  • Chicken
  • Turkey
  • Duck

Bones
After you have eaten the meat off the bones, such as Kentucky Fried Chicken-freeze and store until you have a stock pot’s worth of bones to boil up.
At the supermarket-after the poultry has been de-boned or the flesh removed for ground meat

Fish-Cook for 12 to 24 hours
Source at the fish market or supermarket:
Fish heads and skeletons after the fish has been filleted
Salmon and other fish steaks with the bone in-eat the fish, freeze the bones, until you have a stock pot’s worth of bones to boil up.

Beef, Lamb, Pork, Ham Bones-Cook for 24 to 72 hours
Source at your supermarket, or local butcher or farmer’s market

There are 4 types of bones to look out for:

  1. Marrow bone
  2. Knuckle bones
  3. Feet/trotters/hooves
  4. Tails, such as oxtail

A combination of marrow and knuckle bones will give you a rich broth with lots of nutrition and gelatin from the knuckles. Feet will yield a lot of thick gelatin. Check the meat aisle in your local supermarket for packages of bones for soup or stew.

Ask the butcher to cut your marrow bones into 2 or 3 inch pieces so they will fit into the pot easily.

Other sources of bones-any meat you eat with a bone in it. Freeze until you have a full stock pot of bones to boil up. Roast the bones for 20 minutes in a 400F oven to enhance the flavor.

Lamb-lamb shank is easy to cook and an excellent source of marrow. Ham bones and ham hocks are perfect for split pea and ham soup.

Wild Game-Cook 24 to 72 hours
If you know any hunters, ask them for the bones. Try venison, rabbit, wild boar. Ask if they can cut up the long bones into 2 to 3 inch pieces if it is a large animal. Farmed bison will work well; you can buy the bones online.

Whole Foods Market-Check the freezer section for bags of bones.
Online-Check for bone broth bones from organic farms and ranches.
Local farms-Ask your local farmer to set aside some bones for you.
In most cases, these bones will still have meat on them, so you will be getting high-quality food for pennies.

Use this checklist to start making your own healthy and economical bone broth at home.

 Bones: Best choices include:

  • Chicken or Turkey Bones (such as after you have roasted one)  BONE AND MEAT BUYING GUIDE
  • Ham Hock
  • Beef Bones with marrow in them, such as those pictured to the right
  • Pork Bones
  • Lamb Shank
  • Lamb Shank

Roast these bones at 450F for 20 minutes before putting in water to give the broth a richer flavor.

Kitchen Equipment

  • 1 sharp knife   BONE BROTH BASICS
  • 1 cutting board
  • Large Stock Pot (6 quarts or larger)
  • 1 slow-cooker (6 quarts or larger) [optional]
  • Wire-mesh Strainer
  • Ladle
  • Coffee filter-re-usable, or paper filters
  • Funnel
  • Glass Jars for storages Or plastic containers with tight-fitting lids for storage

Basic Bone Broth Recipe
4 pounds of bones    How to make Bone Broth
Water to cover bones in pot
Generous dash of apple cider vinegar
1. Check your bones to make sure there is no excessive fat or gristle on them. Trim as needed.
2. Place the bones in the large stock pot. Fill with water until the bones are covered. Do not overfill the pot.
3. Bring to a boil. Then reduce heat to a simmer, add the vinegar, and cook for 30 minutes.
4. If you are going to use a slow cooker, transfer the recipe to it, being careful not to splash or burn yourself.
5. Cook for 12 to 72 hours depending on your method, and the type of bones.
6. Allow the mixture to cool.
7. Strain through a wire-mesh sieve, or your funnel, lining them with a paper coffee filter if you wish. Or strain through a re-usable coffee filter.

Cooking Time
Beef, Pork, Ham, Lamb 48 to 72 Hours over a simmering flame, or in the slow cooker
Chicken or Poultry: 12 to 24 Hours over a simmering flame, or in the slow cooker
Make sure you check the liquid levels periodically to ensure nothing boils dry.

How to Store Your Bone Broth
Once you have strained the broth, allow to cool to room temperature before placing in bottles or containers so no condensation forms to make the broth watery.
The broth will keep for up to 3 days in the refrigerator and up to 6 months in the freezer.

Seasonings and Vegetables (optional)
Herbs and Spices such as Bay Leaf, Bouquet Garni, black pepper, celery salt, hickory smoked salt
Vegetables: Garlic, Onion, Carrots, Celery, Peppers, Vegetables for Stew or Soup combinations

Strain through the sieve. Use the strained items for dog food. Just remember to remove the bay leaf or bouquet garni and check with your fingers for small bone fragments.

  • Super Bones

The most nutritious meat bones to look for: BONE AND MEAT BUYING GUIDE

1. Marrow bone
2. Knuckle bones
3. Feet/trotters/hooves
4. Tails, such as oxtail

Poultry and pork feet yield plenty of thick gelatin.

  • Cooking Times

Poultry Bones-Cook for 12 to 24 hours

The most nutrient rich bones are poultry feet!
Find a source!

Fish Bones – Bring to a light boil and then simmer for 12 to 24 hours

Beef, Lamb, Pork, Ham Bones – Bring to a light boil and then simmer 24 to 72 hours

A combination of marrow and knuckle bones will give you a rich broth with lots of nutrition and gelatin from the knuckles.

Lamb-lamb shank is easy to cook and an excellent source of marrow. Ham bones and ham hocks are perfect for split pea and ham soup.

  • Make sure to use organic ingredients, if its beef or lamb it must be grass fed, chicken must be free range and fish must be wild.

Wild Game – Bring to a light boil and then 24 to 72 hours

Preparation Tip! Freeze until you have a full stockpot of bones to boil up.

Flavor Tip! Roast the bones for 20 minutes in a 400F oven to enhance the flavor.